Home > TV and anime > Rosy Business or Jin Guo Xiao Xiong (2010) — episodes 1 to 11

Rosy Business or Jin Guo Xiao Xiong (2010) — episodes 1 to 11

Far be it for me to start off along the expected route but, as I begin watching this series, I’m immediately reminded of Safe Guards or Tie Xue Bao Biao, which was aired by TVB in 2006. This is a story about a family running a successful business with succession issues. It’s always the way when you have sons, in this case, the competent one who can save the business is adopted and so hated by the natural heirs. Perhaps this overlap in my mind is inspired by the presence of Kwok Fung who was the patriarch of the family in Safe Guards and plays the pivotal Prince in the first episodes of Rosy Business or Jin Guo Xiao Xiong (broadcast by TVB in 2010). Another figure reappearing is Wayne Lai who was the patriarch’s brother in Safe Guards and now appears as Chai Kau, an inexperienced and temperamental man learning fast how to survive in a big city. When we get to the third wife, Lau Fong it seems she was an armed guard and uses the same knife-in-the-shoe trick. There’s an amazing loss of confidence in this character who’s shown physically fighting in a flashback, but has become a frightened mouse by the time this series starts.

Hong Bo Kei (Sheren Tang) as the loyal matriarch

Yes, in Rosy Business or Jin Guo Xiao Xiong there’s already something deeply familiar about the set up with three stepbrothers — Cheung Bit Man (Pierre Ngo), Cheung Bit Mo (Kelvin Leung), and Cheung Bit Ching (Ron Ng) — one of whom is obviously devious and somewhat corrupt, the dim one and the competent one. At the start of the first episode, there are three wives — Yan Fung Yee (Susan Tse), Pang Kiu (Kiki Sheung) and Lau Fong — for the wealthy rice producer and dealer Cheung Kiu (Elliot Yue) and a fourth Hong Bo Kei (Sheren Tang) is added. Needless to say, this fourth wife is obviously going to be the saviour before and after her husband falls into a coma. This is not to predict this is going to be a boring rerun. In fact, Safe Guards was somewhat poor so it’s not a high bar to jump over.

The mainland Chinese are also fairly contemptuous of this new serial, seeing an overlap with The Grand Gate Mansion or Da Zhai Men which is also about a Qing Dynasty family business dealing in TCM. It ran for some 80 episodes and followed the generations through to the 1950s. In that it has a matriarchal rather than a patriarchal figure, it’s perhaps slightly closer to Rosy Business in style but rather more ambitious in coverage through time. The mainland dramas tend to focus on the historical period as much as the drama, ensuring we get a good view of the struggle the characters have to survive. The Hong Kong equivalents pay less attention to the history and just get on with the story.

Chai Kau (Wayne Lai) running hot and cold

So here comes that story. Hong Bo Kei is the only survivor of a magistrate’s family who took the Emperor’s rice to feed the starving poor. She’s been working in the Prince’s home as a cook but now marries into the rice magnate’s family. As the first-born son, Cheung Bit Man thinks he’s entitled to inherit, pays the men below market rates and cheats them whenever possible. When he asks the men how to increase rice production, Chai Kau tells him to kill all the birds. Fortunately, Hong Bo Kei is able to stop this and so avoid the inevitable famine. Cheung Bit Man son took the credit for the idea and so gets the blame. Kidnappers then take Cheung Bit Mo (only his mother would notice this loss). Hong Bo Kei takes command and, with the help of Chai Kau, tricks the kidnappers into running away. When Cheung Bit Man tries to take yet more credit, his father gets so angry the disinheritance now looks a certainty. With famine in adjacent provinces, the local triad run by Pang Hang (Lee Sing Cheung) the brother of the second wife, demands a 30% increase in shipping costs. Chai Kau has been humiliated by the triad boss three times and wants revenge. He proposes to move the rice across the land. It’s more expensive but better than paying more to the triad.

Yan Fung Yee (Susan Tse) as troublemaker in chief

Except it would be wiser to contact known gangsters on the route before setting off. That way, you can buy safe passage. What we actually have is a stupid attempt to run the blockade and have the rice stolen. Now our intrepid Chai Kau has to use his wiles to get the rice back. Frankly, this is tedious and uninvolving. But, when the new armed guards bring the rice into town, it sets up the potential for intergang rivalry. Yet this fizzles out as a compromise is reached with the delivery being split between the two gangs. We then get into the tired plot situation of the owner of the business dropping into a coma without making a definitive arrangement leaving control of the business to Hong Bo Kei. Yan Fung Yee convinces Pang Kiu into turning against Hong Bo Kei. Lau Fong is, as usual, annoyingly weepy and submissive. After some interminable twists and turns, Hong Bo Kei is confirmed in charge. This is a serious waste of two hours.

Ron Ng and Kelvin Leung: the good and the dim

At this point, we get into a tiresome subplot involving Chai Kau. Pang Heng has a mistress who is routinely unfaithful with Cheung Bit Man. He persuades her to seduce Chai Kau and then summons Pang Heng so the man can be caught in flagrante delicto. Yet again Hong Bo Kei has to save him. This time Pang Heng and his gang propose to torch Chai Kau. Once the immediate threat is over, the town shuns Chai Kau as a rapist so he’s thinking of running away to hide with the gang in the hills. This gang is proposing to go straight and run a haulage business. They want Chai Kau’s skills to make it a success. Yan Fung Yee then incites the second wife to frame some servants for theft. The idea is to drive out everyone loyal to Hong Bo Kei. Meanwhile, the old master just lies there with an occasional twitch of a finger to prove he’s still alive.

I take it back. Rosy Business or Jin Guo Xiao Xiong makes Safe Guards or Tie Xue Bao Biao look good. Both TVB serials are made on the cheap with threadbare stories. The reason for giving the nod to Safe Guards is that it was first in time with this plot and it did have slightly better production values. I suppose I will watch this to the end — I am, after all almost halfway through — but I will need plenty of alcohol to get me through.

For the review of the second half see: Rosy Business or Jin Guo Xiao Xiong (2010) — episodes 12 to the end.

  1. XW
    April 12, 2012 at 4:08 am

    Sorry, Rosy business has been one of the best drama serials that TVB has produced. Up there with War and Beauty and Greed of Man.

    • April 12, 2012 at 9:47 am

      It’s always good to have a different view of the same thing. As a matter of interest, what do you think makes it so good?

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