Home > Books > Black Wings III: New Tales of Lovecraftian Horror edited by S T Joshi

Black Wings III: New Tales of Lovecraftian Horror edited by S T Joshi

Black Wings III jacket

Black Wings III: New Tales of Lovecraftian Horror edited by S T Joshi (PS Publishing, 2014) “Houdini Fish” by Jonathan Thomas is a wonderful way to start a Lovecraftian anthology with an obsessive archaeologist and some of his students digging up an old machine of unknown purpose. Curiously, it gives off a glow despite being left in pieces. Having satisfied himself the parts are not radioactive, he begins to assemble them and fails to connect this activity with the rather strange appearances and disappearances about town. Academics never seem to see beyond their noses even when rubbed in it. “Dimply Dolly Doofy” by Donald R Burleson uses an original trigger for the arrival of this particular threat. This is a particularly interesting idea, but it then falls into very predictable territory. Similarly “The Hag Stone” by Richard Gavin is a story built around an impressive central image that it doesn’t quite sustain interest over its length. “Underneath an Arkham Moon” by Jessica Amanda Salmonson and W H Pugmire is a very traditional story you read for the quality of the prose which is pleasingly poetic without being excessive. So often, stories like this wander off into detail. This avoids redundancy, cuts quickly to the meat, and then deals with the consequences. “Spiderwebs in the Dark” by Darrell Schweitzer is delightfully wry as it charts the growing friendship between a bookseller and a customer who randomly comes and goes. It seems this interloper has looked back in time to discover these two men are to become fast friends so, of course, he popped over and made it so.

“One Tree Hill (The World as Catalysm)” Caitlin R Kiernan (also appears in The Ape’s Wife) is another story that delights in the ambiguities and inexactitudes of language as we meet the science journalist who fears the lake and adjacent cemetery. but won’t be deterred from walking up the hill. Put it down to perversity or destiny as you will. He’s going to climb that hill no matter what. The result is elegantly inconsequential. “The Man with the Horn” by Jason V Brock is a story with an uneasy balance between Erich Zann or comparable musicians, and other deities or mythological creatures who play horns. Although it builds a good initial atmosphere of mystery and uncertainty, what we see from the halfway point on is not sufficiently Lovecraftian. Similarly, “Hotel del Lago” by Mollie L. Burleson is one of these single experience stories that fails to resonate when the man finds an unexpected hotel as he crosses a desert landscape.

 S T Joshi — the ultimate Lovecraft expert

S T Joshi — the ultimate Lovecraft expert

“Waller” by Donald Tyson is an outstanding story which perfectly captures the essence of the Mythos and then goes somewhere interesting with it. The title refers to people who literally fall through alley walls and find themselves in a different world where one part of their bodies is prized. Our hero contrives to avoid initial capture and then shows remarkable toughness when put to the test. “The Megalith Plague” by Don Webb is equally fascinating as history poses a question. Way back when, humanity was into megaliths and stone circles. Then all-of-a-sudden, we stopped. Putting aside the question of the benefits of stopping (like ten thousand years of wars and pestilence, and a few years of peace), what would happen if we started building these henges again? At the end, we’re left to decide whether the outcome is an improvement. “Down Black Staircases” by Joseph S. Pulver, Sr takes a man with a mission on an unexpected detour into Kingsport where he’s forced on the run. Barely managing to escape, he’s then pursued by natural paranoia until he can run no more. This has a frenetic pace and energy about it that commands attention and nicely captures the fear of the pursued.

“China Holiday” by Peter Cannon continues the theme of paranoia as an American couple go on a holiday to China and he discovers, to his amazement, that the beings who may once have lived in the waters off Innsmouth, may have taken up residence in the newly created waters now controlled by the Three Gorges Dam. Or perhaps he’s just dreaming more vividly and worries to much about using the primitive Chinese plumbing. Either way, the story takes slightly too long to get going. “Necrotic Cove” by Lois Gresh asks the always pertinent question about two best friends, one a man-trap who acquires wealth through marriage, the other physically deformed and alone until her friend comes back from the latest marriage. Their relationship endures but, as the one who’s deformed develops cancer and is approaching death, they make one last trip together and discover a new aspect to their relationship. Ignoring the Lovecraftian overlay, this is an impressively insightful story about the two women. “The Turn of the Tide” by Mark Howard Jones is a rather affecting story in which a young woman struggles to decide whether she wants to share her life or to find a different place in which to seek happiness. Again, this says something potentially profound about young people and the choices they must make about family and relationships, particularly when it affects where they might decide to live. “Weltschmerz” by Sam Gafford shows a man whose daily routine commuting to work in a bank where he works as an accountant, defines his world-weariness. Then one day, a new “runner” who delivers internal mail, breaks into his bubble of routine and exposes him to a different view of reality. Needless to say, things are never the same again. “Thistle’s Find” by Simon Strantzas is one of these “tooth and claw” stories in which a young man who’s down on his luck and needs somewhere to hide, remembers the kindness shown him by a neighbour when he was young. However, this memory proves to have unexpectedly dangerous consequences but, as they say, “any port in a storm”. Which leaves us with “Further Beyond” by Brian Stableford. This nicely matches the opening story with a machine enabling people within its sphere of influence to see more than they were expecting. It’s a very good way to bring a superior anthology to a successful conclusion. That there are a couple of duds is to be expected. A perfect set of stories is a rarity, particularly in the Lovercraftian universe where most ideas have been worked and reworked. On balance, Black Wings III maintains the excellent overall standard of the series and is recommended.

For a review of the two anthologies in this series, see:
Black Wings: Tales of Lovecraftian Horror
Black Wings II: New Tales of Lovecraftian Horror.

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