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Posts Tagged ‘Arthur Conan Doyle’

Doyle After Death by John Shirley

August 17, 2014 8 comments

cover-doyle-after-death1

Doyle After Death by John Shirley (Witness Impulse, 2013) starts off as great fun in a metaphysical fashion and then grows slightly more serious towards the end as various characters are forced to confront the reality of their true selves. On the first page, our narrator Nick Fogg dies in Las Vegas. He’s doing his best to earn a crust as a private investigator but ends up with a big burden of guilt. No matter what your view of the afterlife (which may vary from angels strumming harps to a number of virgins waiting for you if you have killed an infidel or two), his spirit ends up in a new body beside a wine-coloured sea. Walking along the shore, he find the official greeter who duly introduces him into the local community which is called Garden Rest. As you will gather from the book’s title, one of the village’s residents is Sir Arthur Conan Doyle, and so begins the tale of Sherlock’s creator and a modern gumshoe who are caught up in an investigation of a murder. That’s when he’s not drinking, engaging in sex, and denying he brought any cigarettes over with him — tobacco is the one thing everyone seems to miss in this “place”.

So now you see why I said the book was metaphysical. All the people on this plane are already dead so it’s somewhat paradoxical to suggest more of more of them might be able to die again. The trick, if you can master it, is to control the elements from which the body has been constructed and deformulate it. The locals have the reverse process down to a fine art. If you want a new house, all you have to do is have a couple of experts thrust their hands into the soil on the site and, hey presto, the building is formulated out of ectoplasm drawn from the ground. Indeed, the first third of the book is a rather gentle ramble round this part of the afterlife with Nick Fogg being shown the ropes and introduced to the cast of local characters who are drawn from across time and racial divides.

John Shirley with an interesting view of the afterlife

John Shirley with an interesting view of the afterlife

This makes the book slightly uncharacteristic of Shirley who’s better known for hard-edged storytelling in the science fiction and horror genres. Although there’s a wealth of careful thinking invested in the creation of this plane of reality and the rules governing existence on it, this is more a fantasy. Yes there are moments when there are signs there may be slightly more horror underlying the operation of life after death, but this is a fairly amiable murder mystery with Doyle using some of the forensic skills he learned from Dr Bell to pick up clues. Only as we come into the final third when Doyle’s wife is kidnapped do we see something of the “larger than life” style that Shirley usually employs.

As to the mystery element, we know little of the two men who have died. It seems one was a homeless man back on Earth who didn’t change much when he crossed over. The victim found as Fogg arrives was a botanist, but we’re not given a chance to meet him or get any sense that Doyle and Fogg are engaged in seeking justice for him. It’s just a puzzle there to be solved as and when the peregrinations around this neck of the woods permit. Rather the focus of the book is the failure of both Doyle and Fogg to resolve their emotions relating to their earlier lives. In the afterlife, Doyle can have access to the two women he married when alive. So which one should he prefer? Similarly, through dreams, Fogg relives the key moments before he died and we get to see why he feels so guilty. By and large, these elements seem the strongest in the book. So as our detective duo move towards a form of redemption, they have the murders to solve and Doyle’s kidnapped wife to recover. In this, the birds and local wildlife offer words of comment and encouragement. And, in the end, there’s a reasonably fair resolution of the major plot elements. So this is a gentle book with occasional weird digressions. It’s not a Holmesian-style mystery with deductive reasoning festooning the landscape. They get the right answer because there’s no-one else left to chase. This makes Doyle After Death a fairly undemanding read with occasional fun and some interesting ideas about what an afterlife might look like.

For a review of a fiction collection by John Shirley, see In Extremis. There are two standalone novels:
Bleak History
New Taboos
and two novelisations called:
Borderlands: The Fallen
Resident Evil: Retribution.

Elementary: Season 2, Episode 24. The Great Experiment (2014)

May 17, 2014 2 comments

Elementary poster

This review discusses the plot so, if you have not already watched this episode, you may wish to delay reading this.

“I’m sorry, did you say I was being framed?” asked Mycroft Holmes (Rhys Ifans), “That’s bollocks!” (a British English term of endearment). “You just invented that to break up Joan and I!” (British English speakers are always so precise in how they speak). “Well,” says Sherlock Holmes (Jonny Lee Miller), “what do you think about your car when we start the engine from up here?” “Oh, well, perhaps you have a point. Could you not just have shown me the bomb? I rather liked that car.” Isn’t it wonderful when brothers get on so well together. So with the injunction not to touch the first editions, Sherlock leaves Dr Joan Watson (Lucy Liu) with Mycroft and gives his permission for them to resume rutting (British English for, “I’m not really jealous, just mildly upset.”). Once they are alone together (again) this actually gives Mycroft the chance to explain why he didn’t follow his father into business and never became the detective Sherlock once thought he might become (deliberate ambiguity). Instead he became a failed restauranteur and sometime operative for MI6, now surplus to requirements. Meanwhile Sherlock has broken into a car because he wants somewhere comfortable to sit while watching the bookstore that may hold the clue to the mole’s identity. Later he and Watson confirm the bookstore owner is an Iranian agent and, once the code on the arms is cracked, they confirm Mycroft’s handler, Sharington (Ralph Brown) as the mole (not really a surprise).

We have to see Elementary: Season 2, Episode 24 The Great Experiment (2014) on multiple levels. First it has to bring this four episode narrative arc to an end. That’s achieved with little mystery element involved. Watson identifies the vital link with a murder in New York. Sherlock understands how the blood splatter was generated (they make a great team even when not firing on all cylinders), and once they have the emails, the blood evidence and the wife’s testimony, they have enough to crack the Iranian spy’s morale. No need to threaten him with water-boarding. Just ten seconds watching Sherlock produce the evidence is enough for him to confess and give up his MI6 link — the Iranians don’t go in for hardening their spies to resist interrogation. They are not the fanatics we in the West believe. I suppose this is mildly successful as the solution to a murder goes in television series land. Let’s pass on.

Sherlock (Jonny Lee Miller),  Joan (Lucy Liu) and Mycroft, (Rhys Ifans)

Sherlock (Jonny Lee Miller), Joan (Lucy Liu) and Mycroft, (Rhys Ifans)

The other two elements plus one contingent question for the cliffhanger are how the triangle between the Holmes boys and Watson can be resolved and what Sherlock will then plan to do. For an American serial, one of the more interesting moments comes in the confrontation between Mycroft and Sharington. It’s making the cultural point that the British are still caught up in the class system and, if you come from the wrong side of the tracks, there’s a glass ceiling. No-one can be promoted unless they have the right family, the right school and university, and right view of the world. Recognition that a worthless member of the aristocracy is valued more highly than a grammar school boy is enough to drive our MI6 operative into the arms of the Iranians. Wow! on two levels. No matter whether it’s true of the British secret service, this is an epic stereotype to place before an American audience. Obviously this is the reason we Brits lost the Empire. The other extraordinary factor is that our slighted spy should have chosen the Iranians. Did they just pay better than everyone else?

So what do we think of this blood-is-thicker-than-water approach to the relationship between Sherlock and Mycroft? I can perhaps see it working from Mycroft to Sherlock. He’s the more human of the two and would be more prepared to act out of sentiment. I’m even quite pleased to see Sherlock considering an apology to Mycroft as part of his addiction rehabilitation step program. But I’m not convinced Mycroft and the NSA would suddenly become best buddies. Even Sherlock is disgusted at the lazy solution to the problem. Watson, of course, is disgusted because she and Sherlock were making good progress toward resolving matters and now Mycroft has to disappear. This suggests he cared so little for her, he would not wait to see how the dynamic duo might be able to solve the problems. You would think he would be strongly motivated to stay around and would work with them to achieve that end. This is self-sacrifice for the plot and avoids the need to keep paying an imported British actor to continue in the show. I’m also pleased to see nothing changes for Watson. Creating her own space is still a good idea. As she puts it, staying in Sherlock’s gravity well does rather lock her into a fixed orbit. But I’m less convinced Sherlock has the temperament to go off with MI6. This almost certainly means breaking up the team with Watson which is bad emotional news for him. From the other side, I don’t really believe MI6 would accept him anyway which gives the scriptwriters an excuse to leave him in New York for the next season. So all of this leaves me reasonably satisfied. Elementary: The Great Experiment was inevitably convenient in the way it ended everything in the time available and had pleasing emotional resonance in Sherlock’s responses to a difficult situation. When the series returns, it will be interesting to see whether Detective Marcus Bell (Jon Michael Hill) and Captain Tobias Gregson (Aidan Quinn) get more screen time. The show has a better balance when Sherlock and Watson have someone to play off.

For the reviews of other episodes, see:
Elementary: Season 1, Episode 1. Pilot (2012)

Elementary: Season 1, Episode 2. While You Were Sleeping (2012)
Elementary: Season 1, Episode 3. Child Predator (2012)
Elementary: Season 1, Episode 4. The Rat Race (2012)
Elementary: Season 1, Episode 5. Lesser Evils (2012)
Elementary: Season 1, Episode 6. Flight Risk (2012)
Elementary: Season 1, Episode 7. One Way to Get Off (2012)
Elementary: Season 1, Episode 8. The Long Fuse (2012)
Elementary: Season 1, Episode 9. You Do It To Yourself (2012)
Elementary: Season 1, Episode 10. The Leviathan (2012)
Elementary: Season 1, Episode 11. Dirty Laundry (2013)
Elementary: Season 1, Episode 12. M (2013)
Elementary: Season 1, Episode 13. The Red Team (2013)
Elementary: Season 1, Episode 14. The Deductionist (2013)
Elementary: Season 1, Episode 15. A Giant Gun, Filled With Drugs (2013)
Elementary: Season 1, Episode 16. Details (2013)
Elementary: Season 1, Episode 17. Possibility Two. (2013)
Elementary: Season 1, Episode 18. Déjà Vu All Over Again. (2013)
Elementary: Season 1, Episode 19. Snow Angel. (2013)
Elementary: Season 1, Episode 20. Dead Man’s Switch. (2013)
Elementary: Season 1, Episode 21. A Landmark Story. (2013)
Elementary: Season 1, Episode 22. Risk Management. (2013)
Elementary: Season 1, Episodes 23 & 24. The Woman and Heroine (2013)
Elementary: Season 2, Episode 1. Step Nine (2013)
Elementary: Season 2, Episode 2. Solve For X (2013)
Elementary: Season 2, Episode 3. We Are Everyone (2013)
Elementary: Season 2, Episode 4. Poison Pen (2013)
Elementary: Season 2, Episode 5. Ancient History (2013)
Elementary: Season 2, Episode 6. An Unnatural Arrangement (2013)
Elementary: Season 2, Episode 7. The Marchioness (2013)
Elementary: Season 2, Episode 8. Blood Is Thicker (2013)
Elementary: Season 2, Episode 9. On the Line (2013)
Elementary: Season 2, Episode 10. Tremors (2013)
Elementary: Season 2, Episode 11. Internal Audit (2013)
Elementary: Season 2, Episode 12. The Diabolical Kind (2014)
Elementary: Season 2, Episode 13. All in the Family (2014)
Elementary: Season 2, Episode 14. Dead Clade Walking (2014)
Elementary: Season 2, Episode 15. Corps de Ballet (2014)
Elementary: Season 2, Episode 16. One Percent Solution (2014)
Elementary: Season 2, Episode 17. Ears to You (2014)
Elementary: Season 2, Episode 18. The Hound of the Cancer Cells (2014)
Elementary: Season 2, Episode 19. The Many Mouths of Andrew Colville (2014)
Elementary: Season 2, Episode 20. No Lack of Void (2014)
Elementary: Season 2, Episode 21. The Man With the Twisted Lip (2014)
Elementary: Season 2, Episode 22. Paint It Black (2014)
Elementary: Season 2, Episode 23. Art in the Blood (2014).

Elementary: Season 2, Episode 23. Art in the Blood (2014)

May 10, 2014 2 comments

Elementary poster

This review discusses the plot so, if you have not already watched this episode, you may wish to delay reading this.

Elementary: Season 2, Episode 23. Art in the Blood (2014) starts off by confirming the most probable scenario for the behaviour of Mycroft Holmes (Rhys Ifans). His Diogenes restaurant in London had been in trouble. He was approached by the criminals some ten years ago. Their visit was followed by MI6 operatives who turned him into an “asset” — what a nicely ambiguous word to apply to a human being. Anyway, the new version of reality is that brother Holmes had a flair for duplicity and was also possessed of a highly retentive memory. His collaboration with the first criminal gang led to other contacts. In due course, he was in the first rank of people capable of becoming a supergrass and giving evidence to bring down multiple criminal organisations. His handler had suggested removing Sherlock Holmes (Jonny Lee Miller) from New York, fearing he might queer the pitch. Sadly, the handler’s fears were not unfounded, but now we have Dr Joan Watson (Lucy Liu) back. So is everything alright? She’s remarkably calm about the entire experience. At no point during her kidnapping did she seem unduly worried. Either she had perfect confidence Sherlock would rescue her or, as the director of the episode, she’d read the script. Now the handler has tasked Sherlock with a New York case. It’s a quid pro quo for saving Watson’s life and sweeping the bodies under the carpet in a way that should prevent the criminals from coming after our heroes for revenge.

Lucy Liu and Jonny Lee Miller

Lucy Liu and Jonny Lee Miller

The case is being handled by NYPD as a robbery gone wrong, but the man who died was a retired MI6 agent. He’d become bipolar, hence his rustication. But a week or so before his death, he’d contacted London claiming intelligence (sic). MI6 ignored him as mentally unstable. Now he’s dead, they are worried he might actually have discovered something important. Holmes and Watson therefore insert themselves into the police investigation to find out what’s what — it also gives a fleeting moment of screen-time for Detective Marcus Bell (Jon Michael Hill) and a glance of Captain Tobias Gregson (Aidan Quinn). When our detective duo go to the mortuary, they find someone has removed the arms from the dead body. It seems there are no good locks on mortuary doors these days. Anyway, with an hour gap in the surveillance tape, we’re into the devious world of spying and, after interviewing the ex-wife who wasn’t wholly ex, Sherlock has a theory about why the arms were taken. This leaves us with a refreshing moment between Watson and Mycroft. He wants humbly to apologise and seems to hope they can go back to where they were before. In what represents a quite impassioned speech from Watson, she considers the full extent of Mycroft’s dishonesty and, for all his faults, explains why Sherlock is preferable. Later Sherlock offers a lengthy sharing (about five seconds) about how it feels to be deceived by someone “you” love. Yes, our platonic couple are just about to have an intelligent conversation when the ex who wasn’t turns up. She didn’t want to say anything in front of the police but she has photographs and, potentially, they explain everything. Now all we have to do is rerun the dancing men decoding game to solve the case and keep British secrets safe. Everything would be just dandy if Watson did not chose this moment to tell Sherlock she’s going to move out of the brownstone. Life never runs smooth for these couples in television series.

Lucy Liu and Rhys Ifans

Lucy Liu and Rhys Ifans

Let’s treat all this as the set-up because, after this point, the episode takes off into higher levels of ingenuity. Keeping this slightly hypothetical, let’s assume there’s a mole inside MI6 and that, despite his mental disorder, the dead ex-agent had come up with a way to identify him or her. There might be suspicion about a particular New York bookstore but no evidence. Now more people know about the death of the ex-agent (the theft of the arms does rather elevate the profile of the case), there’s a chance to resolve matters. Holmes could identify the mole, or the mole could frame Mycroft. If the latter was a correct supposition, this would give Sherlock an interesting dilemma. This is the brother who has consistently lied to him, tasered him when he might have interfered too much, and the man who might take Watson away from him. Should Sherlock listen to the title of this episode, act as if blood is thicker than water, and save Mycroft (assuming he’s innocent, of course)? In the meantime, let’s assume Watson has discovered more about the lies Mycroft has been spinning. If he had previously been inside MI6 and then got out, what might persuade him to return to the fold? The answer, of course, is a threat to Sherlock. If we can believe Mycroft this time, it seems he might just have been his brother’s keeper, i.e. keeping him out of jail. Such a disclosure might persuade Watson to forgive Mycroft and get back into bed with him. Quite how Sherlock would react if he discovered their resumption of sexual activity is uncertain in the long run.

When I wrote the review of the last episode, I confess to scepticism the scriptwriters could get out of the corner into which they had painted themselves. I humbly admit I was wrong. The way this episode plays out is beautifully judged and represents a new high in the series. Everything is left poised for the season conclusion next week. Only seven more days to wait to see how the script ties up all the loose ends. At this point it’s appropriate to commend the acting from the three principals. Jonny Lee Miller and Lucy Liu haven’t been given a great deal to do in the early part of the season, but this episode sees both of them demonstrating a significant emotional range. In part, this is due to the chemistry with Rhys Ifans who has proved outstanding in all the episodes in which he’s appeared. It’s also interesting to see two MI6 senior officials in Jim Norton and Ralph Brown. These are very experienced British actors and it shows. The only slightly false note in the episode was the establishment where the British agents were hanging. Does such a place exist in New York? It just looked too like an old-fashioned London club to be convincing. Other than this, Elementary: Art in the Blood was outstanding.

For the reviews of other episodes, see:
Elementary: Season 1, Episode 1. Pilot (2012)

Elementary: Season 1, Episode 2. While You Were Sleeping (2012)
Elementary: Season 1, Episode 3. Child Predator (2012)
Elementary: Season 1, Episode 4. The Rat Race (2012)
Elementary: Season 1, Episode 5. Lesser Evils (2012)
Elementary: Season 1, Episode 6. Flight Risk (2012)
Elementary: Season 1, Episode 7. One Way to Get Off (2012)
Elementary: Season 1, Episode 8. The Long Fuse (2012)
Elementary: Season 1, Episode 9. You Do It To Yourself (2012)
Elementary: Season 1, Episode 10. The Leviathan (2012)
Elementary: Season 1, Episode 11. Dirty Laundry (2013)
Elementary: Season 1, Episode 12. M (2013)
Elementary: Season 1, Episode 13. The Red Team (2013)
Elementary: Season 1, Episode 14. The Deductionist (2013)
Elementary: Season 1, Episode 15. A Giant Gun, Filled With Drugs (2013)
Elementary: Season 1, Episode 16. Details (2013)
Elementary: Season 1, Episode 17. Possibility Two. (2013)
Elementary: Season 1, Episode 18. Déjà Vu All Over Again. (2013)
Elementary: Season 1, Episode 19. Snow Angel. (2013)
Elementary: Season 1, Episode 20. Dead Man’s Switch. (2013)
Elementary: Season 1, Episode 21. A Landmark Story. (2013)
Elementary: Season 1, Episode 22. Risk Management. (2013)
Elementary: Season 1, Episodes 23 & 24. The Woman and Heroine (2013)
Elementary: Season 2, Episode 1. Step Nine (2013)
Elementary: Season 2, Episode 2. Solve For X (2013)
Elementary: Season 2, Episode 3. We Are Everyone (2013)
Elementary: Season 2, Episode 4. Poison Pen (2013)
Elementary: Season 2, Episode 5. Ancient History (2013)
Elementary: Season 2, Episode 6. An Unnatural Arrangement (2013)
Elementary: Season 2, Episode 7. The Marchioness (2013)
Elementary: Season 2, Episode 8. Blood Is Thicker (2013)
Elementary: Season 2, Episode 9. On the Line (2013)
Elementary: Season 2, Episode 10. Tremors (2013)
Elementary: Season 2, Episode 11. Internal Audit (2013)
Elementary: Season 2, Episode 12. The Diabolical Kind (2014)
Elementary: Season 2, Episode 13. All in the Family (2014)
Elementary: Season 2, Episode 14. Dead Clade Walking (2014)
Elementary: Season 2, Episode 15. Corps de Ballet (2014)
Elementary: Season 2, Episode 16. One Percent Solution (2014)
Elementary: Season 2, Episode 17. Ears to You (2014)
Elementary: Season 2, Episode 18. The Hound of the Cancer Cells (2014)
Elementary: Season 2, Episode 19. The Many Mouths of Andrew Colville (2014)
Elementary: Season 2, Episode 20. No Lack of Void (2014)
Elementary: Season 2, Episode 21. The Man With the Twisted Lip (2014)
Elementary: Season 2, Episode 22. Paint It Black (2014)
Elementary: Season 2, Episode 24. The Great Experiment (2014).

Elementary: Season 2, Episode 22. Paint It Black (2014)

Elementary poster

This review discusses the plot so, if you have not already watched this episode, you may wish to delay reading this.

Well Elementary: Season 2, Episode 22 Paint It Black (2014) gives us a better view of the relationship between the brothers — not the most loving might be the best way of describing the depths of the emotions on display. It seems the Diogenes Restaurant has not been doing quite as well as might be expected and, to help pay the bills, Mycroft Holmes (Rhys Ifans) has been funding the enterprise by doing a little money laundering and other minor criminal things. For these purposes, it doesn’t really matter who approached whom nor whose idea it was that Mycroft open a New York branch. The criminals wanted a foothold in America and it was achieved. Now the deal has been complicated. The criminals who routinely meet in the restaurant noticed Dr Joan Watson (Lucy Liu) taking a photograph. She’s now kidnapped and held to persuade Mycroft to do one more small favour. A senior executive in the New York office of a Swiss bank has acquired details of customers who would prefer their account holdings remain private. He’s gone into hiding but a large group of people from the US Federal Government, various other governments, acronymed organisations, and wealthy individuals all want him and the list found. The claimed deal with the criminals using Mycroft is that they won’t kill Watson if Sherlock Holmes (Jonny Lee Miller) finds the missing banker first. He and Mycroft have been given 48 hours to work their magic. Except it isn’t quite as simple as that — hardly a surprise given we’ve already seen Mycroft talking with someone about forcing Sherlock to leave New York.

Mycroft Holmes (Rhys Ifans) feeling the love from Sherlock Holmes (Jonny Lee Miller)

Mycroft Holmes (Rhys Ifans) feeling the love from Sherlock Holmes (Jonny Lee Miller)

So while Sherlock and Mycroft use their father’s name to get into the bank and then Sherlock persuades the senior management to hire him to find their missing executive and the list, Watson is saving the life of one of the gang who has kidnapped her. It really does come in useful when you can use a bottle of vodka and a box cutter to do surgery on a kitchen table. During this humanitarian effort, the lead criminal tells Watson that Mycroft has criminal tendencies. If nothing else, this probably signals an intention to kill her (that and the fact she has seen all their faces, of course). So with her fate sealed, we watch Holmes work out where the missing man is probably hiding. It’s a not quite impossible trick which I remember seeing before in one of these CSI episodes where the height of the moon (or perhaps it was the sun) on a known date enabled the team to work out where the lakeside cabin was to be found. I suppose it doesn’t matter whether it’s actually possible. It sounds vaguely credible in both series so we should accept it. Anyway, having arrived at the right place, the Holmes boys find the banker and work out the detail of the plot.

I’m quite happy to see Holmes revert to the man who would have tortured Moran when it comes to asking Kurt Yoder (Michael Gaston) a few pertinent questions — the unadmitted love for Watson is an effective driving force. However, it’s at this point that I slightly switched off. We’re now deep into a serial as this metanarrative works its way through to the last two episodes. This incident of betrayal, while not unexpected, is not something to be lightly assessed. I might speculate, assuming we’re being canonical, that Mycroft has been working for British intelligence from the outset and this entire venture into America has been a sting operation to bring some serious criminals out into the light — the fact the British sniper calls him “Sir” is indicative. But, if that’s the case, there would be no reason to be quite so dishonest with Sherlock, or to be negotiating to try and remove him from New York. So I’m not going to play the game of second-guessing the script. If it’s satisfactorily resolved, this episode will be a good step forward. But if the explanation is fudged, which seems not unlikely, this bait and switch with Mycroft’s character will seem contrived and I’ll be glad to see the end of this season. This leaves me with two asides. The first is the fleeting presence of Detective Marcus Bell (Jon Michael Hill) and the complete absence of Captain Tobias Gregson (Aidan Quinn). I suppose they will be given compensatory extra minutes in the next episode to make up for the script writing them out this time round. The second point of interest is Elementary: Paint It Black was directed by Lucy Liu. Credit where credit is due. This is a very professional job.

For the reviews of other episodes, see:
Elementary: Season 1, Episode 1. Pilot (2012)

Elementary: Season 1, Episode 2. While You Were Sleeping (2012)
Elementary: Season 1, Episode 3. Child Predator (2012)
Elementary: Season 1, Episode 4. The Rat Race (2012)
Elementary: Season 1, Episode 5. Lesser Evils (2012)
Elementary: Season 1, Episode 6. Flight Risk (2012)
Elementary: Season 1, Episode 7. One Way to Get Off (2012)
Elementary: Season 1, Episode 8. The Long Fuse (2012)
Elementary: Season 1, Episode 9. You Do It To Yourself (2012)
Elementary: Season 1, Episode 10. The Leviathan (2012)
Elementary: Season 1, Episode 11. Dirty Laundry (2013)
Elementary: Season 1, Episode 12. M (2013)
Elementary: Season 1, Episode 13. The Red Team (2013)
Elementary: Season 1, Episode 14. The Deductionist (2013)
Elementary: Season 1, Episode 15. A Giant Gun, Filled With Drugs (2013)
Elementary: Season 1, Episode 16. Details (2013)
Elementary: Season 1, Episode 17. Possibility Two. (2013)
Elementary: Season 1, Episode 18. Déjà Vu All Over Again. (2013)
Elementary: Season 1, Episode 19. Snow Angel. (2013)
Elementary: Season 1, Episode 20. Dead Man’s Switch. (2013)
Elementary: Season 1, Episode 21. A Landmark Story. (2013)
Elementary: Season 1, Episode 22. Risk Management. (2013)
Elementary: Season 1, Episodes 23 & 24. The Woman and Heroine (2013)
Elementary: Season 2, Episode 1. Step Nine (2013)
Elementary: Season 2, Episode 2. Solve For X (2013)
Elementary: Season 2, Episode 3. We Are Everyone (2013)
Elementary: Season 2, Episode 4. Poison Pen (2013)
Elementary: Season 2, Episode 5. Ancient History (2013)
Elementary: Season 2, Episode 6. An Unnatural Arrangement (2013)
Elementary: Season 2, Episode 7. The Marchioness (2013)
Elementary: Season 2, Episode 8. Blood Is Thicker (2013)
Elementary: Season 2, Episode 9. On the Line (2013)
Elementary: Season 2, Episode 10. Tremors (2013)
Elementary: Season 2, Episode 11. Internal Audit (2013)
Elementary: Season 2, Episode 12. The Diabolical Kind (2014)
Elementary: Season 2, Episode 13. All in the Family (2014)
Elementary: Season 2, Episode 14. Dead Clade Walking (2014)
Elementary: Season 2, Episode 15. Corps de Ballet (2014)
Elementary: Season 2, Episode 16. One Percent Solution (2014)
Elementary: Season 2, Episode 17. Ears to You (2014)
Elementary: Season 2, Episode 18. The Hound of the Cancer Cells (2014)
Elementary: Season 2, Episode 19. The Many Mouths of Andrew Colville (2014)
Elementary: Season 2, Episode 20. No Lack of Void (2014)
Elementary: Season 2, Episode 21. The Man With the Twisted Lip (2014)
Elementary: Season 2, Episode 23. Art in the Blood (2014)
Elementary: Season 2, Episode 24. The Great Experiment (2014).

Elementary: Season 2, Episode 21. The Man With the Twisted Lip (2014)

April 26, 2014 2 comments

Elementary poster

This review discusses the plot so, if you have not already watched this episode, you may wish to delay reading this.

Elementary: Season 2, Episode 21. The Man With the Twisted Lip (2014) demonstrates the strength and weakness of the formula adopted by the series producers. The early decision was made to present this show as essentially a series of standalone episodes with only the occasional linkage and minimal character development. Past experience usually means this condemns the show to death by formula. There just aren’t enough interesting plots to maintain the series over a season. More to the point, there are a number of canonical expectations the fans will have so, with common sense prevailing, the show has slowly been developing the character arcs and introducing a metanarrative. When the two elements collide as in this episode, something has to give. In this case, the balance between the murder mystery and the metanarrative left neither very satisfactory.

We start off in an AA meeting which is, to put it mildly, a very heavy-handed way of establishing the theme for this end-run of episodes. When asked to identify the greatest threat to his continued sobriety, Sherlock Holmes (Jonny Lee Miller) tells the room his uniqueness as an individual is likely to be his downfall. With characteristic arrogance, he perceives himself as literally without peer. In practical terms, he feels he’s lowering himself to relate to others (this sounds really bad so we’ll pass quickly on). He wonders how he should react to other people when he sees no value in relationships. At what point should he stop trying to maintain them? I suppose we’re to take this as an overflow from the loss of his friend Alistair in the previous episode. Having just lost one of his few friends, he’s naturally foreseeing a life of increasing loneliness. Many lie to themselves when they claim not to need others. Holmes has enough realism to see loss of human contact would leave him seeking alternative approaches to filling in the emptiness. Meanwhile, Dr Joan Watson (Lucy Liu) hears someone crying on the stairs outside the room where the AA meeting is being held. It’s one of the early regulars who’s concerned she hasn’t heard from her sister. This gives us the lead into the murder mystery which is solved but without any reference back to the sister fighting addiction. So she’s just left to deal with the grief of her sister’s loss without Watson (or Holmes) offering any kind of support. Sadly there just isn’t enough time to follow through with plot elements that don’t fit the metanarrative theme.

Joan Watson (Lucy Liu) and Sherlock Holmes (Jonny Lee Miller) enjoying the great weather for drones

Joan Watson (Lucy Liu) and Sherlock Holmes (Jonny Lee Miller) enjoying the great weather for drones

In the other part of the episode, we begin with a moment of madness. Yes, we get to see Mrs Hudson (Candis Cayne) and Mycroft Holmes (Rhys Ifans) again. Our devious brother has made the trip back across the Atlantic to try to break up Holmes and Watson so, to make Holmes jealous, Mycroft not only asks Watson to visit his restaurant, but also then proposes they resume their relationship. So this stays with the initial theme of the episode set in the AA meeting as we now wait to see how far Holmes will go to keep the relationship with Watson. At first, his reaction to being told of Mycroft’s proposal is to say nothing. For once, he’s showing maturity, giving her space while she crafts a reply to Mycroft. While she’s thinking, the search for the missing sister turns up two dead bodies. It seems the sister was collateral damage in a hit on the “unknown” male. When they check his wallet, they find he was working at a start-up developing drones for the military. So Holmes is implicitly respecting Watson’s privacy while dealing with a case giving surveillance capacity to the government. Except, of course, he doesn’t respect her privacy and goes to see Mycroft at the restaurant where, just by chance, he sees someone who was there the last time he visited. A photograph shows this regular customer to have an interesting provenance.

Mycroft Holmes (Rhys Ifans)

Mycroft Holmes (Rhys Ifans)

As to the murder mystery, this is another of these vaguely SFnal, near future technology episodes where we’re supposed to accept the faintly absurd notion of a microminiaturized murder weapon. I was just about onboard for the surveillance aspect (although the machine really does have the most powerful batteries since the energizer bunny first hopped into view). The use we see here is ridiculous. The larger drone version is far more credible although it would be very visible and, if actually fitted with a shotgun usually only firing two bullets, less practical. A machine gun would be more sensible. Anyway, Watson able to infiltrate the office of the suspect and open his superduper safe with a hairpin were equally silly plot devices to bring this part of the episode juddering to a halt before they had rounded up all the technicians to equip and fly these drones. This is another of these major government scandal stories that fails to spark any political intervention from any of the federal bodies. As to the metanarrative, it’s all left in a nicely balanced way with Watson kidnapped, but the build-up to it is far too cursory. This is a potentially far more interesting development and, for once, it could mean the next episode is entirely devoted to the metanarrative and has no murder for Holmes to investigate. This might also give more screen time to Captain Tobias Gregson (Aidan Quinn) and Detective Marcus Bell (Jon Michael Hill) who have been less visible recently. We can only live in hope. As it stands, Elementary: The Man With the Twisted Lip is a below average episode despite the cliffhanger ending.

For the reviews of other episodes, see:
Elementary: Season 1, Episode 1. Pilot (2012)

Elementary: Season 1, Episode 2. While You Were Sleeping (2012)
Elementary: Season 1, Episode 3. Child Predator (2012)
Elementary: Season 1, Episode 4. The Rat Race (2012)
Elementary: Season 1, Episode 5. Lesser Evils (2012)
Elementary: Season 1, Episode 6. Flight Risk (2012)
Elementary: Season 1, Episode 7. One Way to Get Off (2012)
Elementary: Season 1, Episode 8. The Long Fuse (2012)
Elementary: Season 1, Episode 9. You Do It To Yourself (2012)
Elementary: Season 1, Episode 10. The Leviathan (2012)
Elementary: Season 1, Episode 11. Dirty Laundry (2013)
Elementary: Season 1, Episode 12. M (2013)
Elementary: Season 1, Episode 13. The Red Team (2013)
Elementary: Season 1, Episode 14. The Deductionist (2013)
Elementary: Season 1, Episode 15. A Giant Gun, Filled With Drugs (2013)
Elementary: Season 1, Episode 16. Details (2013)
Elementary: Season 1, Episode 17. Possibility Two. (2013)
Elementary: Season 1, Episode 18. Déjà Vu All Over Again. (2013)
Elementary: Season 1, Episode 19. Snow Angel. (2013)
Elementary: Season 1, Episode 20. Dead Man’s Switch. (2013)
Elementary: Season 1, Episode 21. A Landmark Story. (2013)
Elementary: Season 1, Episode 22. Risk Management. (2013)
Elementary: Season 1, Episodes 23 & 24. The Woman and Heroine (2013)
Elementary: Season 2, Episode 1. Step Nine (2013)
Elementary: Season 2, Episode 2. Solve For X (2013)
Elementary: Season 2, Episode 3. We Are Everyone (2013)
Elementary: Season 2, Episode 4. Poison Pen (2013)
Elementary: Season 2, Episode 5. Ancient History (2013)
Elementary: Season 2, Episode 6. An Unnatural Arrangement (2013)
Elementary: Season 2, Episode 7. The Marchioness (2013)
Elementary: Season 2, Episode 8. Blood Is Thicker (2013)
Elementary: Season 2, Episode 9. On the Line (2013)
Elementary: Season 2, Episode 10. Tremors (2013)
Elementary: Season 2, Episode 11. Internal Audit (2013)
Elementary: Season 2, Episode 12. The Diabolical Kind (2014)
Elementary: Season 2, Episode 13. All in the Family (2014)
Elementary: Season 2, Episode 14. Dead Clade Walking (2014)
Elementary: Season 2, Episode 15. Corps de Ballet (2014)
Elementary: Season 2, Episode 16. One Percent Solution (2014)
Elementary: Season 2, Episode 17. Ears to You (2014)
Elementary: Season 2, Episode 18. The Hound of the Cancer Cells (2014)
Elementary: Season 2, Episode 19. The Many Mouths of Andrew Colville (2014)
Elementary: Season 2, Episode 20. No Lack of Void (2014)
Elementary: Season 2, Episode 22. Paint It Black (2014)
Elementary: Season 2, Episode 23. Art in the Blood (2014)
Elementary: Season 2, Episode 24. The Great Experiment (2014).

Elementary: Season 2, Episode 20. No Lack of Void (2014)

April 12, 2014 2 comments

Elementary poster

This review discusses the plot so, if you have not already watched this episode, you may wish to delay reading this.

Elementary: Season 2, Episode 20. No Lack of Void (2014) demonstrates the value of building a strong narrative arc for each of its characters. In a way, this highlights the slightly deceptive nature of the show’s structure. Ostensibly, we’re supposed to push each episode into the mental pigeonhole of a mystery show. In reality, this is a show about a recovering addict who shares his house with a professional sober companion. To pay the bills, they solve crimes as consultants to the NYPD. This means the real test for Sherlock Holmes (Jonny Lee Miller) is to be able to rise every morning and not do drugs. There are times when it’s hard for him not to relapse. This is one of those times.

We start with Sherlock looking to add another accent to his repertoire — this time the Derry accent from Northern Ireland (just in case he ever has to blend in with IRA or Provo terrorists) — while Dr Joan Watson (Lucy Liu) goes to drop off files with the NYPD. It later appears that the actor and informal accent coach, Alistair Moore (Roger Rees), has died of a heart attack. While at NYPD, Captain Tobias Gregson (Aidan Quinn) asks Watson to look at a prisoner called Apollo Mercer, a known pickpocket. Surprisingly, he’s lying dead on the floor. This is more serious than expected. Surely one of the officers should have noticed he was dying? Anyway, Joan looks at the “stuff” coming out of his mouth and suggests this is a case of anthrax poisoning. Really? No-one in the custody suite even thought of turning over the body of the man to see if he needed medical assistance? Perhaps they held a sweep to decide who should call Gregson and ask him what to do.

Our four principles negotiate to buy the farm

Our four principles negotiate to buy the farm

Anyway, all this excitement brings Holmes to the hospital where the police are being tested for possible infection. So far, no-one else seems to have been exposed — thank God no-one turned over the body and touched the “stuff” coming out of his mouth. Detective Marcus Bell (Jon Michael Hill) gives Holmes Mercer’s file. It seems he ingested the anthrax. Ergo, he lifted a packet from a mark in Union Square, thought it was cocaine, and decided to get high (which rhymes with die). Our duo reviews all the footage from Union Square (impressive it can all be collected together so quickly), and identifies a man who used his mobile to pay for a cup of coffee. This gives us our first suspect. When the police arrive at his address, the landlord confirms he used to go out for regular walks. Holmes is busy calculating how many footsteps in a ten minute walk, while Watson opens his mail and finds he was renting a storage locker ten minutes away. It’s always good when things come together. Wearing suitable protective clothing, NYPD enter the storage locker and find a body plus many empty trays where the anthrax would have been cultured (40 pounds is the estimate of quantity). Could be we have a bioterrorism episode on our hands. A fingerprint shows a known member of the Sovereign Army was present at some time! They are dangerous homegrown terrorists!

So Bell and Watson go upstate to talk to the new suspect’s brother, while Holmes goes to talk with Alistair’s partner. This all leads to Sherlock arriving at an address in Queens before the police units where he sees a van being loaded. Such are the decisions out of which drama is constructed. Except it’s not the anthrax. That’s a relief. I thought the series was going to end with Sherlock’s funeral (not). Meanwhile Alistair’s son comes round to the brownstone. It now appears his father overdosed. He’d been clean for some thirty years. Holmes has only been clean for two. The death disturbs Holmes on multiple levels. This is a close friend but, as one addict to another, it distresses Holmes that a man can relapse after being clean for so long. It’s a betrayal of all that effort. Holmes knows he’s overreacting a little (well, a lot if truth be told) — it’s upsetting him he’s so upset over his friend’s death. Then the dead body of the suspect turns up. He visited his brother’s farm. They fought. Exit one brother.

As mysteries go, this is serviceable. It’s one of these “but for” crimes where fate intervenes to disrupt an elegant plan and forces those involved to take evasive action. The problem comes with the dilution of any tension. If this was considered a real terrorist threat to New York, there would be a major incident approach with multiple federal agencies involved and political oversight. Yet all we see is a few precinct officers coming in for a briefing by Gregson. It’s not a sufficiently serious response to engage our interest even though there’s a news report of people disposing of their milk and dairy products. I suppose this is intentional to allow a proper focus on Holmes and the resolution of his pain caused by the loss of his friend — he has so few, the loss of one is significant. I’m always somewhat disconcerted when scripts call for the “ghost” of a recently deceased to interact with one of the living. Such a cliché smacks of a little desperation. In this case, however, it does introduce a certain poignancy and is a convenient visual mechanism for allowing Holmes to say goodbye. This makes Elementary: No Lack of Void (2014) a slightly better than average episode.

For the reviews of other episodes, see:
Elementary: Season 1, Episode 1. Pilot (2012)

Elementary: Season 1, Episode 2. While You Were Sleeping (2012)
Elementary: Season 1, Episode 3. Child Predator (2012)
Elementary: Season 1, Episode 4. The Rat Race (2012)
Elementary: Season 1, Episode 5. Lesser Evils (2012)
Elementary: Season 1, Episode 6. Flight Risk (2012)
Elementary: Season 1, Episode 7. One Way to Get Off (2012)
Elementary: Season 1, Episode 8. The Long Fuse (2012)
Elementary: Season 1, Episode 9. You Do It To Yourself (2012)
Elementary: Season 1, Episode 10. The Leviathan (2012)
Elementary: Season 1, Episode 11. Dirty Laundry (2013)
Elementary: Season 1, Episode 12. M (2013)
Elementary: Season 1, Episode 13. The Red Team (2013)
Elementary: Season 1, Episode 14. The Deductionist (2013)
Elementary: Season 1, Episode 15. A Giant Gun, Filled With Drugs (2013)
Elementary: Season 1, Episode 16. Details (2013)
Elementary: Season 1, Episode 17. Possibility Two. (2013)
Elementary: Season 1, Episode 18. Déjà Vu All Over Again. (2013)
Elementary: Season 1, Episode 19. Snow Angel. (2013)
Elementary: Season 1, Episode 20. Dead Man’s Switch. (2013)
Elementary: Season 1, Episode 21. A Landmark Story. (2013)
Elementary: Season 1, Episode 22. Risk Management. (2013)
Elementary: Season 1, Episodes 23 & 24. The Woman and Heroine (2013)
Elementary: Season 2, Episode 1. Step Nine (2013)
Elementary: Season 2, Episode 2. Solve For X (2013)
Elementary: Season 2, Episode 3. We Are Everyone (2013)
Elementary: Season 2, Episode 4. Poison Pen (2013)
Elementary: Season 2, Episode 5. Ancient History (2013)
Elementary: Season 2, Episode 6. An Unnatural Arrangement (2013)
Elementary: Season 2, Episode 7. The Marchioness (2013)
Elementary: Season 2, Episode 8. Blood Is Thicker (2013)
Elementary: Season 2, Episode 9. On the Line (2013)
Elementary: Season 2, Episode 10. Tremors (2013)
Elementary: Season 2, Episode 11. Internal Audit (2013)
Elementary: Season 2, Episode 12. The Diabolical Kind (2014)
Elementary: Season 2, Episode 13. All in the Family (2014)
Elementary: Season 2, Episode 14. Dead Clade Walking (2014)
Elementary: Season 2, Episode 15. Corps de Ballet (2014)
Elementary: Season 2, Episode 16. One Percent Solution (2014)
Elementary: Season 2, Episode 17. Ears to You (2014)
Elementary: Season 2, Episode 18. The Hound of the Cancer Cells (2014)
Elementary: Season 2, Episode 19. The Many Mouths of Andrew Colville (2014)
Elementary: Season 2, Episode 21. The Man With the Twisted Lip (2014)
Elementary: Season 2, Episode 22. Paint It Black (2014)
Elementary: Season 2, Episode 23. Art in the Blood (2014)
Elementary: Season 2, Episode 24. The Great Experiment (2014).

Elementary: Season 2, Episode 19. The Many Mouths of Andrew Colville (2014)

April 5, 2014 2 comments

Elementary poster

This review discusses the plot so, if you have not already watched this episode, you may wish to delay reading this.

Elementary: Season 2, Episode 19. The Many Mouths of Andrew Colville (2014) starts off with one of these stagey set-ups in which Sherlock Holmes (Jonny Lee Miller) views the scene of the latest crime, and solves it on the spot. This time, the high mortician, stripped to the waist, climbs up on to the gurney (these drugs are really wicked, man) and then falls on to the body of the woman he’s preparing (he was standing over her with his shirt off so the nature of these preparations remains obscure to me). When his shoulder hits her head, her jaws close giving him a bite (vampires eat your hearts out, not bite your shoulder) and, just in case you were one of the many doubters, our hero retreats into the cold room where he persuades the thief to announce his presence (what, you didn’t know there was a thief?). I’m glad we got that out of the way quickly. Now to the episode proper. Many moons ago when Dr Joan Watson (Lucy Liu) was still in hospital practice, Aaron Colville was brought into the hospital seriously injured with four stab wounds received while he was in prison awaiting trial. He had pleaded to committing some murders where he bit the victims. When he died, the case was closed. Now a similar crime has been committed and it raises the question whether the original suspicion surrounding the accused was justified.

Jonny Lee Miller as Sherlock Holmes pays the price demanded by Anonymous

Jonny Lee Miller as Sherlock Holmes pays the price demanded by Anonymous

So, for once, we have a flashback with Watson wearing a wig to make her look younger. The dying man whispers something to Dr Fleming (Bruce Altman) as he’s being prepared for surgery. The attending surgeon then fails to save him on the operating table. Because the patient is registered as an organ donor, this is good news for some on the waiting list. When Watson goes back to the hospital, she’s still concerned the surgeon failed to administer an epinephrin injection on a timely basis, preferring heart massage that failed. The surgeon then and now is indignant that his methods are apparently in question. So Sherlock turns down the chance to go treasure hunting with Mycroft in Australia to investigate the latest murders which have bite marks (see the linking coincidence with the opening scene). But to find the owners of the teeth administering the bites then and now is going to require the skills of hackers. This means contacting Anonymous again. They provide copies of x-rays and, in turn, this produces one of the nicest television moments of the week. You see, when Colville was in jail, the prison dentist took an impression of his teeth and issued inmates with standard issue dental plates based on that impression. There are eight men with false teeth giving the bite mark of a killer. But only four of them are on the loose, walking around New York. Of those four, one had shingles and the other a file which he had used to cut down the size of his teeth so they would fit in a box. The odds just keep getting better. When the third shows his denture is broken and so could not have reproduced the bite on the body, that brings it down to the man they can’t find at the address registered with the parole officer. Except he was out on the road with the zombies pretending to be the grateful dead, or something.

Back to the drawing board in search of suspects and, after some ducking and diving, we have a ninth suspect. . . Well, now we need a tenth. So does it all work? In one sense, it does. There’s a certain logic as to the motive. The problem lies in the means. It all relies on the prison dentist telling someone what he’d done. Now I don’t know about you, but if the original of the body was in the ground and you lacked the means of digging it up to take an impression of the teeth, you might not be able to get another dentist to reproduce the additional set of teeth. Unless, of course, the prison dentist had thoughtfully provided a detailed set of impressions. The rest of the episode is taken up with Watson trying to second-guess herself over the failure to save Colville’s life ten years earlier. Guilt does not have to be rational, but I’m not at all sure this self-indulgence is realistic. Having been a professional, I inevitably made mistakes both when I was training and later when I had the responsibility. We can all look back at things we could have done better. I’m not at all sure Watson would have such a problem with this particular case even though she recognises the temptation she felt not to resuscitate the man so his organs could go on to save lives. Since it wasn’t her hands on the patient’s heart, it wasn’t her call to make. More to the point, I don’t think she would go after Fleming with such enthusiasm. It makes her look somewhat out of control and vindictive. Is she hoping to find evidence of major malpractice with a previous colleague acting as a serial killer to collect organs? That’s not in character. Detective Marcus Bell (Jon Michael Hill) and Captain Tobias Gregson (Aidan Quinn) get to bobble along in the wake of our pair as they run through suspects faster than they can find them, making the Many Mouths of Andrew Colville a particularly pleasing title for an average episode.

For the reviews of other episodes, see:
Elementary: Season 1, Episode 1. Pilot (2012)

Elementary: Season 1, Episode 2. While You Were Sleeping (2012)
Elementary: Season 1, Episode 3. Child Predator (2012)
Elementary: Season 1, Episode 4. The Rat Race (2012)
Elementary: Season 1, Episode 5. Lesser Evils (2012)
Elementary: Season 1, Episode 6. Flight Risk (2012)
Elementary: Season 1, Episode 7. One Way to Get Off (2012)
Elementary: Season 1, Episode 8. The Long Fuse (2012)
Elementary: Season 1, Episode 9. You Do It To Yourself (2012)
Elementary: Season 1, Episode 10. The Leviathan (2012)
Elementary: Season 1, Episode 11. Dirty Laundry (2013)
Elementary: Season 1, Episode 12. M (2013)
Elementary: Season 1, Episode 13. The Red Team (2013)
Elementary: Season 1, Episode 14. The Deductionist (2013)
Elementary: Season 1, Episode 15. A Giant Gun, Filled With Drugs (2013)
Elementary: Season 1, Episode 16. Details (2013)
Elementary: Season 1, Episode 17. Possibility Two. (2013)
Elementary: Season 1, Episode 18. Déjà Vu All Over Again. (2013)
Elementary: Season 1, Episode 19. Snow Angel. (2013)
Elementary: Season 1, Episode 20. Dead Man’s Switch. (2013)
Elementary: Season 1, Episode 21. A Landmark Story. (2013)
Elementary: Season 1, Episode 22. Risk Management. (2013)
Elementary: Season 1, Episodes 23 & 24. The Woman and Heroine (2013)
Elementary: Season 2, Episode 1. Step Nine (2013)
Elementary: Season 2, Episode 2. Solve For X (2013)
Elementary: Season 2, Episode 3. We Are Everyone (2013)
Elementary: Season 2, Episode 4. Poison Pen (2013)
Elementary: Season 2, Episode 5. Ancient History (2013)
Elementary: Season 2, Episode 6. An Unnatural Arrangement (2013)
Elementary: Season 2, Episode 7. The Marchioness (2013)
Elementary: Season 2, Episode 8. Blood Is Thicker (2013)
Elementary: Season 2, Episode 9. On the Line (2013)
Elementary: Season 2, Episode 10. Tremors (2013)
Elementary: Season 2, Episode 11. Internal Audit (2013)
Elementary: Season 2, Episode 12. The Diabolical Kind (2014)
Elementary: Season 2, Episode 13. All in the Family (2014)
Elementary: Season 2, Episode 14. Dead Clade Walking (2014)
Elementary: Season 2, Episode 15. Corps de Ballet (2014)
Elementary: Season 2, Episode 16. One Percent Solution (2014)
Elementary: Season 2, Episode 17. Ears to You (2014)
Elementary: Season 2, Episode 18. The Hound of the Cancer Cells (2014)
Elementary: Season 2, Episode 20. No Lack of Void (2014)
Elementary: Season 2, Episode 21. The Man With the Twisted Lip (2014)
Elementary: Season 2, Episode 22. Paint It Black (2014)
Elementary: Season 2, Episode 23. Art in the Blood (2014)
Elementary: Season 2, Episode 24. The Great Experiment (2014).

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