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Agatha Christie’s Marple: The Secret of Chimneys (2010)

Marple Julia McKenzie

You see this is all the fault of Anthony Hope. I suppose not many of you out there will remember this author, but he was mildly famous when I was growing up. Although, truth be told, his reputation did rather rest on just two books: The Prisoner of Zenda and its sequel Rupert of Hentzau. Notice the names of the fictitious countries. Authors then had the same problem as authors now. They had to set their stories in places that resonated with mystery, romance and excitement (although not necessarily in that order). To this end, they either invented countries like Ruritania or set their stories in countries that sounded like one of these supposedly exotic places sandwiched between the Europe we all knew and the Russian expanse of which we knew little. Today, to avoid upsetting allies, dangerous gangsters or terrorists come from North Korea or Dagestan or somewhere obscure. Anyway, when we come to a young author sitting down in the early 1920s, she would likely think her book had to involve people and intrigue over places like Herzoslovakia and feature characters with names like Prince Michael Obolovitch, Count Stylptitch, and so on. That’s where we more formally enter into the novel titled The Secret of Chimneys by Agatha Christie, now adapted as Marple: The Secret of Chimneys (2010).

This young author did rather churn out potboiler thriller novels with more than a suggestion of romance about them. Some are, by any modern standards, diabolically bad. At the time, they were considered full of excitement, romance and mystery (although not necessarily in that order). If you were to take a measuring gauge with some moderately objective pretensions, you might conclude this novel is by no means the worst of this type of novel but, if you tried to put it on the screen as written, today’s audience would curl up and die. This revenant from 1925 must therefore be recast so that we may adsorb its substance without being bored to tears by its delight in the politics and social niceties of the day.

Edward Fox

Edward Fox

The first step, of course, is to abandon the redoubtable Superintendent Battle of Scotland Yard and the amateur sleuth, Anthony Cade, in favour of Miss Marple (Julia McKenzie) with an unusually silent sidekick called Inspector Finch (Stephen Dillane). The only redeeming feature about this latter character is that’s he’s forewarned about Miss Marple who’s been showing up his colleagues as barely competent. So he immediately sets out to avoid the same fate by first listening to her and then arresting the wrong man — a ploy guaranteed to energise the old biddy and get her into top gear to save the innocent one destined for the romantic ending. At this point we must sympathise with Paul Rutman who was paid to write a new mystery. Even at the best of times, it’s difficult to write something to appease the purists while entertaining those new to the title. This is particularly difficult and, under the circumstances, the simplification of the plot to centre on the titular country house is sensible. The opening sections are also moderately well handled but, as we advance through into the broader part of the mystery, the initial glamour is lost and what remains is stolid, confusing and unrealistic.

As an aside, if the production company ever gets around to adapting The Seven Dials Mystery, I hope they remember one of the characters in that later book is now the murderer in this screen adaptation. More judicious rewriting and renaming will be required to avoid confusion. Anyway, let’s not worry about what may never happen. What happens in this story? Well, a group of people come to Chimneys which, for the record, is filmed at Hatfield Hall and Knebworth House. This decaying pile with the leaking roof is owned by a disgraced Lord Caterham (Edward Fox) and hunted by the emergent National Trust which wants to save it for the nation. There’s a high-level political meeting with an Austrian Count who ends up dead in a secret passageway. There’s also a poisoning and other minor excitements, some historical. The identity of the murderer is obscured by changing the apparent time of the shooting. The method used is mildly ingenious and the clue in plain sight is not completely unfair. It’s just incredible. No-one would actually be able to see it. But if we ignore this fact and we have the kind of mind capable of making intuitive leaps to the truth, it’s obvious. There’s also a dire coincidence and one of these self-sacrificing people who decides to cover up the killer’s identity. And did I mention there’s a missing diamond but that’s not the only jewel hidden in Chimneys.

The upshot of all this is that Miss Marple unmasks the killer, finds the diamond, identifies the real jewel hidden in the wall, and sets true love on its rocky path to the future — and all in ninety minutes. No mean feat for our amateur sleuth. All I can say about Marple: The Secret of Chimneys is that it looked good and Jula McKenzie does her best to be Marple-like. Everything else about it is an otherwise competent cast being given increasingly silly things to say and do. As we move into 2010, this series shows no sign of lifting itself off the rock bottom it had reached in 2009.

For reviews of other Agatha Christie stories and novels, see:

Agatha Christie’s Marple (2004) — the first three episodes
Agatha Christie’s Marple (2005) — the second set of three episodes
Agatha Christie’s Marple (2006) — the third set of three episodes
Agatha Christie’s Marple (2007) — the final set of three episodes
Agatha Christie’s Marple: The Blue Geranium (2010)
Agatha Christie’s Marple: A Caribbean Mystery (2013)
Agatha Christie’s Marple: Endless Night (2013)
Agatha Christie’s Marple: Greenshaw’s Folly (2013)
Agatha Christie’s Marple: The Mirror Crack’d from Side to Side (2010)
Agatha Christie’s Marple: Murder is Easy (2009)
Agatha Christie’s Marple: The Pale Horse (2010)
Agatha Christie’s Marple: A Pocket Full of Rye (2008)
Agatha Christie’s Marple: They Do It with Mirrors (2009)
Agatha Christie’s Marple: Why Didn’t They Ask Evans? (2009)
Agatha Christie’s Poirot: The Adventure of the Egyptian Tomb (1993)
Agatha Christie’s Poirot: The Adventure of the Italian Nobleman (1993)
Agatha Christie’s Poirot: The Big Four (2013)
Agatha Christie’s Poirot: The Case of the Missing Will (1993)
Agatha Christie’s Poirot: The Chocolate Box (1993)
Agatha Christie’s Poirot: The Clocks (2009)
Agatha Christie’s Poirot: Curtain. Poirot’s Last Case (2013)
Agatha Christie’s Poirot: Dead Man’s Folly (2013)
Agatha Christie’s Poirot: Dead Man’s Mirror (1993)
Agatha Christie’s Poirot: Elephants Can Remember (2013)
Agatha Christie’s Poirot: Hallowe’en Party (2010)
Agatha Christie’s Poirot: The Jewel Robbery at the Grand Metropolitan (1993)
Agatha Christie’s Poirot: The Labours of Hercules (2013)
Agatha Christie’s Poirot: Murder on the Orient Express (2010)
Agatha Christie’s Poirot: Three Act Tragedy (2011)
Agatha Christie’s Poirot: Underdog (1993)
Agatha Christie’s Poirot: The Yellow Iris (1993)

Game of Thrones: Season 2, Episode 5. The Ghost of Harrenhal

 

Game of Thrones is based on A Song of Ice and Fire by George R R Martin. The content of Season 2 in this television adaptation by HBO is drawn from A Clash of Kings. As before, the production is helmed by David Benioff and D B Weis. Here is the link to my retrospective overview of Game of Thrones Season 1. This is a spoiler-rich discussion of what happens in each episode, so do not read this if you want to watch without prior knowledge.

 

It’s often said that the buck stops when it gets to the top of the food chain or, when there’s no-one else to blame for a decision, you blame the leader. Except despite the generations of experience that should have taught us about morality, our modern society has still not resolved the question of accountability. Borrowing the Americanism, the 99% want the CEOs of the top corporations to be held liable when their organisations do something terrible, yet it’s the top 1% that controls governments and so laws rarely impose any personal liability. Why raise this? Well, at the end of the last episode, we saw Melisandre (Carice Van Houten) use her dark powers. It’s rather like the British Government deciding to firebomb Dresden to demoralise the civil popoulation and hopefully bring a German surrender closer. Had Britain not been on the winning side, a war crimes tribunal would have been very interested in what Winston Churchill had to say about the decision-making. Robb Stark (Richard Madden), on the other hand, is doing his best to ensure his reputation for fairness in battle and the treatment of prisoners afterwards remains unblemished. He wants to win, but not at any price. This may actually be a sign of weakness. Stannis Baratheon (Stephen Dillane) is the ruthless one, prepared to kill his brother while Robb Stark may lack the killer instinct and political pragmatism to get the job done (whatever he thinks the job is which doesn’t always seem entirely clear to him).

Catelyn Stark (Michelle Fairley) and Brienne (Gwendoline Christie) reach agreement

 

Catelyn Stark (Michelle Fairley) and Renly Baratheon (Gethin Anthony) had negotiated a deal when the dark spirit sent by Melisandre strikes. Catelyn covers for Brienne of Tarth (Gwendoline Chrstie) as she escapes and, in due course, they bond. Naturally, Brienne wants to kill Stannis Baratheon to avenge Renly’s death, but that’s postponed until it becomes a practical proposition. Petyr Baelish aka Littlefinger (Aidan Gillen) continues to do a wonderful job of lurking in the background and so saves Loras Tyrell (Finn Jones) and Lady Margaery Tyrell (Natalie Dormer) by persuading them to make a strategic retreat with their troops. He rightly blames Stannis for the death of Renly and advises them it will be safer to keep their options open. Meeting Stannis at this point might provoke the wrong alliance. Interestingly, Lady Margaery says she doesn’t want to be a queen. She want to be the queen. Now that’s an interesting thing to say to a fixer like Littlefinger. In King’s Landing, Cersei Lannister (Lena Headey) and Tyrion Lannister (Peter Dinklage) understand the threat of an army unified under Stannis. Unfortunately, Joffrey (Jack Gleeson) is so full of his own importance, he has decided to run the defence personally. To keep tabs on what everyone is doing, Tyrion pulls strings with Lancel Lannister (Eugene Simon) who’s currently sleeping with Cersei in her brother’s absence, and discovers Cersei is persuading Pyromancer Allyne (Roy Dotrice) to make wildfire — an art that kept the Targaryens in power. Tyrion takes over control of the manufacture, but is deeply worried about the risks of using it anywhere near the city. To further complicate the defence of the city, there are signs of revolution in the air as Joffrey’s cruelty and Cersei’s short-termism begin to bear fruit.

Davos-Seaworth (Liam Cunningham) the honest man who rises in the ranks

 

Ser Davos Seaworth (Liam Cunningham) tries to remonstrate with Stannis about how Renly died but is fobbed off. Stannis prefers willful blindness as his defence should he come before a war crimes tribunal. As a reward for asking awkward questions, Ser Davos is put in sole charge of the fleet to attack King’s Landing — as the Onion Knight, this is not exactly the level of responsibility he was looking for, but he genuinely is the right man for the job. Better still, he persuades Stannis to leave Melisandre behind lest she gain too much power. If they are to win, it must be a secular victory without any reliance on magic or new gods. Theon Greyjoy (Alfie Allen), on the other hand, is humiliated by his father and sister. They give him a single ship to command. Arya (Maisie Williams) has a confrontation with Tywin Lannister (Charles Dance) and discusses the art of survival with Jaqen H’ghar (Tom Wlaschiha). As her reward for saving three lives, Jagen offers her three deaths. At least she’s completely honest about using murder as a tool. It’s all about accountability. As she says, anyone can be killed and that’s an acceptable way of doing business when the survival of those she values is at stake.

 

Jon Snow (Kit Harington) walks on into the North to meet Qhorin Halfhand (Simon Armstrong) who confirms that Manse Rayder has collected all the Wildlings together and will attack the Wall. Jon Snow goes off in a small raiding party to kill Mance. He accepts assassination as an acceptable means of winning a war. Back in Winterfell, Bran Stark (Isaac Hempstead Wright) dreams that the sea comes to Winterfell and floods the castle. Being a seer is deeply frustrating when the messages are framed as unexplained allegories. Osha (Natalia Tena) listens with interest to all his questions and confirms there are legends of the three-eyed raven north of the Wall — a useful fact to know.

Daenerys Targaryen (Emilia Clarke), Ser Jorah Mormont (Iain Glen) and Pyat Pree (Ian Hanmore)

 

Xaro Xhoan Daxos (Nonso Anozie) offers Daenerys Targaryen (Emilia Clarke) a fortune if she will marry him. The political situation in Qarth is interesting as the dragons represent a long-term investment in power. The question for Daenerys is whether she should take immediate help and sail across the the Westeros as the other contenders for the Iron Throne fight among themselves, or go slow and return on her own terms when she’s ready. Ser Jorah Mormont (Iain Glen) advises slow and steady wins the race.

 

This is a more compact episode keeping the focus on the moves to win the Iron Throne or perhaps just take control of a part of Westeros. When we move briefly away to other places, we see everyone taking strategic decisions as they try to make the best of their individual situations. That said, it’s a bit workmanlike. There’s an awful lot crammed in here and I’m not sure everyone will follow what’s happening unless they’ve read the book. Worse, the chance to make a frightening opening is lost with a perfunctory death for Renly. I really don’t understand why this was not featured. There’s also little made of the consolidation of military power as a result of the death. Having had the confrontation between Stannis and Renly, it seems a shame not to deal with the aftermath more clearly. So this is good in parts but not quite so good together.

 

For reviews of Season 2, see:
Game of Thrones: Season 2, Episode 1. The North Remembers
Game of Thrones: Season 2, Episode 2. The Night Lands
Game of Thrones: Season 2, Episode 3. What Is Dead May Never Die
Game of Thrones: Season 2, Episode 4 Garden of Bones
Game of Thrones: Season 2, Episode 6. The Old Gods and the New
Game of Thrones: Season 2, Episode 7. A Man Without Honor
Game of Thrones: Season 2, Episode 8. The Prince of Winterfell
Game of Thrones: Season 2, Episode 9. Blackwater
Game of Thrones: Season 2, Episode 10. Valar Morghulis
Game of Thrones: Season 2 — the HBO series considered

 

Game of Thrones: Season 2, Episode 4. Garden of Bones

July 2, 2012 2 comments

 

Game of Thrones is based on A Song of Ice and Fire by George R R Martin. The content of Season 2 in this television adaptation by HBO is drawn from A Clash of Kings. As before, the production is helmed by David Benioff and D B Weis. Here is the link to my retrospective overview of Game of Thrones Season 1. This is a spoiler-rich discussion of what happens in each episode, so do not read this if you want to watch without prior knowledge.

 

Thematically we’ve moved beyond a mere consideration of the nature of power and into a study of what it takes to be an effective leader. Stannis Baratheon (Stephen Dillane) is almost completely without charisma, but he has the best claim to the throne so people follow him if only because it feels the right thing to do. Joffrey (Jack Gleeson) demonstrates it’s possible to be a complete nightmare for almost everyone around him yet still command by virtue of sitting on the throne. It’s a case of being in the right place at the right time with enough people cowed into following. As the Hand, Tyrion Lannister (Peter Dinklage) is proving highly effective in making himself safe and signalling to the other clever people around him that, if they hang together, they can survive despite Joffrey and Cersei Lannister (Lena Headey). He’s a survivor as leader because he has real political ability. Robb Stark (Richard Madden) has that rough northern charm that other northerners appreciate and the southeners think is evidence of mental deficiency until he beats them in battle. Catelyn Stark (Michelle Fairley) is quietly competent and people would follow her because she’s full of common sense. Arya Stark (Maisie Williams) is a leader in the making because she’s not afraid and instinctively loyal to those for whom she accepts responsibility.

King Joffrey (Jack Gleeson) on the Iron Throne

 

Renly Baratheon (Gethin Anthony) also has charm, albeit of a different variety, and would prefer to negotiate rather than fight. He may have a big army, but it’s more for show. He’s also not pragmatic enough to be successful in the long term. He should get his wife, Lady Margaery Tyrell (Natalie Dormer), pregnant but is so completely gay, he can’t find her attractive enough for an erection. Balon Greyjoy (Patrick Malahide) is a taker. He doesn’t talk or negotiate. He just takes while the taking is good. People follow him because they all get their share. So far, no-one apart from Samwell Tarly (John Bradley) is following Jon Snow (Kit Harington). I suppose more people will follow after he’s had a chance to read Leadership For Dummies, due to be delivered by an Amazon in the next seven days. Theon Greyjoy (Alfie Allen) is showing all the symptoms of opportunism hampered by a shortage of brain but unhindered by any sense of morality. Apart from deciding who next to take to bed, he’s never had the chance to lead anything but a life free of responsibilities while held as a hostage by the Starks.

Jon Snow (Kit Harington) and Samwell Tarly (John Bradley)

 

We see Robb Stark winning the latest battle and taking the strategic high moral ground. He refuses to allow prisoners to be tortured to discover what the Lannisters might be planning. He prefers not to give them an excuse to harm his two sisters, while actually taking time to comfort his own wounded as best he can. There are also signs he may be running short of supplies. When challenged by Talisa Maegyr (Oona Chaplin) to defend killing innocent conscripts in the Lannister army, he has no good reply. His denial he would sit of the Iron Throne rings true but when he says he has no plan as to what should happen if he wins the war. . . Is that what leaders are supposed to be like? Joffrey, being on the losing side of the most recent battles, decides that hitting Sansa Stark (Sophie Turner) is the best response. Fortunately for her, Tyrion is on hand to save a complete humiliation. Joffrey, however, is diverted by a voyuristic S&M session with two girls sent by Tyrion (HBO just can’t resist that extra sex scene of casual cruelty). To bolster his position, Tyrion blackmails Lancel Lannister (Eugene Simon) into spying on Cersei for him. Forewarned is forearmed, so they say.

Robb Stark (Richard Madden) wins another battle

 

Meanwhile Petyr Baelish aka Littlefinger (Aidan Gillen) is off to see Renly and Lady Margaery Tyrell who seem to think numerical superiority wins battles. Littlefinger scathingly dismisses this idea with the insight that, if this was true, mathematicians would rule the world. To his surprise, Littlefinger finds Lady Margaery loyal to Renly (for now, anyway). When he meets Catelyn, there’s no love but the possibility of a deal is offered if she trades the hostage Jaime Lannister (Nikolaj Coster-Waldau). As a token of his good faith, Tyrion returns her husband’s head (that should swing the deal). Brothers Renly and Stannis briefly discuss whether Stannis will be acclaimed king. Even Catelyn’s attempt to speak sense to the boys fails. So, to settle matters, Sir Davos Seaworth (Lian Cunningham) secretly brings Melisandre (Carice Van Houten) ashore and she gives birth to a dark shadow. Presumably, this is the seed she collected from Stannis in their sexual frolic now given a slightly different existence from the one he was expecting.

Daenerys Targaryen (Emilia Clarke) out in the desert

 

In the desert there’s word from a scout Daenerys Targaryen (Emilia Clarke) and the survivors will be welcomed in Qarth, a city three day’s march away. Standing outside the city in the so-called Garden of Bones, the Spice King (Nicholas Blane) asks her to show the dragons as a condition of entry. Instead, she threatens to return when they are fully grown and have the dragons burn the city down. Laughing at this display of gumption, Xaro Xhoan Daxos (Nonso Anozie) gives surety for them and they enter. Arya and the others arrive in jail at Harrenhal and are forced to watch as one of their number is taken every day and tortured. Tywin Lannister (Charles Dance) arrives in time to save the remaining prisoners and recruit Arya as a his cup bearer.

 

This is a better episode and is moving things forward with a more urgent feel. Pleasingly, both Robb Stark and Tywin Lannister are shown with a good practical feel for what’s necessary to keep their troops focused on the essentials. The selection of which scenes to pluck from the book is working well to create a rolling series of insights into the characters and their motivations. Although we’re still in the slow build-up to the big battle coming near the end, we can now see where the real battlelines are being drawn.

 

For reviews of Season 2, see:
Game of Thrones: Season 2, Episode 1. The North Remembers
Game of Thrones: Season 2, Episode 2. The Night Lands
Game of Thrones: Season 2, Episode 3. What Is Dead May Never Die
Game of Thrones: Season 2, Episode 5. The Ghost of Harrenhal
Game of Thrones: Season 2, Episode 6. The Old Gods and the New
Game of Thrones: Season 2, Episode 7. A Man Without Honor
Game of Thrones: Season 2, Episode 8. The Prince of Winterfell
Game of Thrones: Season 2, Episode 9. Blackwater
Game of Thrones: Season 2, Episode 10. Valar Morghulis
Game of Thrones: Season 2 — the HBO series considered

 

Game of Thrones: Season 2, Episode 2. The Night Lands

 

Game of Thrones is based on A Song of Ice and Fire by George R R Martin. The content of Season 2 in this television adaptation by HBO is drawn from A Clash of Kings. As before, the production is helmed by David Benioff and D B Weis. Here’s the link to my retrospective overview of Game of Thrones Season 1. This is a spoiler-rich discussion of what happens in each episode, so do not read this if you want to watch without prior knowledge.

 

One of the fascinating things about the way production companies cast and then directors direct is the way they deal with “foreign” accents. Now as one originating on the North East coast of England on the north bank of the Tyne, I can tell the difference between all the major northern accents and some of the Scottish ones. If you asked me about American accents, I could vaguely distinguish between the north and south, but it’s a vast country and it would be guesswork as to where anyone came from. So here’s the thing. This American production company wants to make a series about a fictional world, but it would be convenient to map accents on to our world. So, for example, since British actors come more cheaply than their American counterparts, we could cast all the Lannisters as southern English with received

Jaime Lannister emoting in Danish

pronunciation (apart from the Danish guy, that is — he looks so good, viewers will just eat up anything he manages to say in English). That would leave us with a convenient group of accents for the northern folk, Scottish for the wildlings and Irish for the Iron Islands (Danish for the good-looking). Except it hasn’t worked out with any degree of consistency. We’ve people in the same families speaking with different accents. Now, of course, we’re not striving for realism here. This is fantasy and it’s a miracle any of them can actually string two sentences together. More to the point, Game of Thrones is actually been made with the American market uppermost in HBO’s mind so the accuracy of accents is the last thing anyone’s worrying about. Who among the millions of American viewers will know or care whether a father and son should speak with the same accent? This is the real world of television production and I should just “get over it”. Except, since these Americans are hiring some of Britain’s best acting talent, they could have asked these Brits to sort it out among themselves. Leaving it to random chance is sloppy directing when it was so easy to fix.

Jaqen H’ghar (Tom Wlaschiha) not looking quite as deadly as usual

 

As we start off The Night Lands, Arya (Maisie Williams) investigates the contents of the cage on the King’s Highway and so meets Jaqen H’ghar (Tom Wlaschiha). She watches from the safety of the ditch as Yoren (Francis Magee) drives away the first two soldiers searching for Gendry (Joe Dempsie) one of the Baratheon bastards. They exchange brief family details but the two runaways fail to bond. Varys (Conleth Hill) comes to see Tyrion Lannister (Peter Dinklage) and Shae (Sibel Kikilli) so they can exchange ritual threats and then watch Cersei Lannister (Lena Headey) meet with Theon Greyjoy (Alfie Allen) and reject the terms for peace he brings from Robb Stark (Richard Madden). With no awareness of the dangers, she also refuses to send more men to the Wall demonstrating little sense of diplomacy or long-term interest in self-defence. Later Tyrion confronts Janos Slynt (Dominic Carter) for his role in slaughtering the bastards. That leaves Bron (Jerome Flynn) in charge as the Commander of the City Watch. His morals are no better, but at least he’s a known quantity. The argument over Slynt’s fate then spreads to include Cersei who has never forgiven Tyrion — their mother died while giving birth to the “dwarf” — and finds it hard to take criticism from him on her style of government. He, on the other hand, feels obliged to point out that rulers depend on the passivity of their people. If the masses rise up, one or two rulers and their guards stand no chance. It’s therefore refreshing that Cersei was not the one to order the slaughter of the bastards. That was Joffrey (Jack Gleeson).

Stannis Baratheon (Stephen Dillane) and Melisandre (Carice van Houten)

 

Equally lacking in the sense department, Jon Snow (Kit Harington) finds himself under pressure from Samwell Tarly (John Bradley) to take Gilly (Hannah Murray), one of the Craster (Robert Pugh) “wives”, with the group when they leave. It seems Craster acts ruthlessly when the wives produce boys. The trouble is that Jon Snow has too much initiative and even more curiosity. He finds it difficult to follow orders.

 

There’s more sex in this episode as Balon Greyjoy (Patrick Malahide) and the fierce Yara Greyjoy (Gemma Whelan) welcome the randy and, to them, effete Theon Greyjoy to the Iron Islands. Petyr Baelish aka Littlefinger (Aidan Gillen) offers a shoulder to one of those in his brothel whose bastard child was murdered (that’s a cold shoulder, of course). Salladhor Saan (Lucian Msamati) talks to Davos Seaworth (Lian Cunningham) as one pirate to another on whether Stannis Baratheon (Stephen Dillane) can succeed when he has the smallest army. As men of honour and atheists both, the old pirate comrades agree to combine their naval forces. This puts them slightly at odds with Matthos Seaworth (Kerr Logan) who’s rather devout in the new religion. Stannis is also having trouble with his conversion to the ways of his seer, so Melisandre (Carice van Houten) turns to seduction to complete the conversion. She’s the means to the end of making her own prophesies come true.

 

This episode is moving us along at a reasonable pace, showing just how dangerously incompetent the Cersei/Joffrey combination has become. While enjoying the company of the Stark family, Theon Greyjoy has also lost touch with the ways of his family. Politically, everything is falling into place for the different claimants to start fighting for the throne. The remaining Starks and Daenerys Targaryen (Emilia Clarke) have less to do. In a way, The Night Lands is still all set-up but the slightly brooding atmosphere of the episode is easing.

 

For the reviews of other episodes, see:
Game of Thrones: Season 2, Episode 1. The North Remembers
Game of Thrones: Season 2, Episode 3. What Is Dead May Never Die
Game of Thrones: Season 2, Episode 4. Garden of Bones
Game of Thrones: Season 2, Episode 5. The Ghost of Harrenhal
Game of Thrones: Season 2, Episode 6. The Old Gods and the New
Game of Thrones: Season 2, Episode 7. A Man Without Honor
Game of Thrones: Season 2, Episode 8. The Prince of Winterfell
Game of Thrones: Season 2, Episode 9. Blackwater
Game of Thrones: Season 2, Episode 10. Valar Morghulis
Game of Thrones: Season 2 — the HBO series considered

 

 

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